At T&C, we often host business leaders and community members for intimate presentations to share insight about their industry. This helps our team stay on the pulse of what’s new in Alaska and beyond. Recently, the Rasmuson Foundation, undeniably one of Alaska’s biggest benefactors when it comes to strengthening Alaska and the people who live here, joined us for one such discussion. President and CEO Diane Kaplan, along with, Angela Cox, vice president of external affairs and Roy Agloinga, program officer, spoke about their organization and the work it does in Alaska.

Three takeaways from the Rasmuson Foundation were:

 

1.Money stays in state

When Jenny and Edward Anton “E.A.” Rasmuson arrived in Yakutat at the dawn of the 20th century, no one could have imagined the extraordinary impact they and their descendants would have on Alaska. Through the years, E.A. and Jenny came to love Alaska. He was a person of many interests who had a personal commitment to improve the quality of life and shape Alaska’s future. Today, the Foundation is lead by third and fourth generation Rasmusons. Every penny is invested into supporting projects of lasting impact.

 

2. Few foundations are like Rasmuson and its Tier 1 grants

Tier 1 grants are the Foundation’s signature grant program. More than 150 awards are approved annually. These are grants of up to $25,000 focusing primarily on capital projects. Such as the purchase of furnishings, equipment and appliances, medical equipment, sports equipment, scientific equipment, musical instruments, and much more.

 

3. Making a lasting impact

 While most of us are familiar with the Foundation and the incredible work it does in our communities, sometimes the numbers themselves are remarkable. Total charitable payments since its establishment exceed $350 million. In 2017 alone, $20.5 million in grants were awarded to Alaskans and their communities.

There are countless ways the Rasmuson Foundation improves the quality of life for Alaskans, and that’s just what this world could use – a little compassion.

 

“Helping others is an Alaskan tradition.” – Elmer Rasmuson, son